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San Luis Reservoir Fishing Report 2023 [Tips, Spots, Pictures, and Everything You Need to Know]

How To Fish San Luis Reservoir

San Luis Reservoir Fishing Report

San Luis Reservoir is a large lake that sits 120 miles away from San Francisco, or 276 miles from Los Angeles.  

Overall it’s a popular weekend getaway lake known for its fantastic striped bass and largemouth bass fishing. You can also catch catfish and crappie fishing during the summer. Conversely, you can catch trout, salmon and sturgeon fishing during the winter. In this post you’re going to be given the blueprint to fish this lake.

So what are the best tips for fishing San Luis Reservoir?  There are three important factors you must know  if you want to know how to fish San Luis Reservoir successfully. First, you need to know what kind of fish is in San Luis Reservoir. Second, it’s important for you to know which part of the lake each species can be found. Lastly, knowing what are the best baits that work on San Luis Reservoir is vital.  However, tactics, baits, and locations will be different for each type of fish that you target. So let’s talk about the steps you need to take in order to give you the best chance of catching a fish on San Luis Reservoir.

About San Luis Reservoir

San Luis Reservoir is a moderately deep body of water with the average depth being 130 feet and a maximum depth of 270 feet when the lake is completely full. Being 9 miles long and 5 miles across, fishing at San Luis Reservoir can be gangbusters when you have over 12,700 acres to fish!

Important Lake Warnings

Algae blooms may be present which may affect fishing, swimming, and water contact in general. 

According to parks.ca.gov, “every one of California’s new laws requires boat operators to have a California Boating Card. The card is required for anyone under the age of 41 to operate a boat in California’s waters.”

If you are fishing and camping, fire bans may be in effect due to the ongoing drought conditions.

WARNING:  There’s a lot of information about this subject you’ll probably want to come back to. No one expects you to remember all these tips. We know your time is precious, so we really tried to over-deliver in value for you. Additionally, we frequently update reports like this, so you’ll want to stay up to date with any changes or additional tips we include for you. 

We found that the easiest way to save and bookmark this report so you can come back to it later is to share it on your favorite social media platform, especially if you use your phone to get important tips like the ones in this report here…

Click on your favorite social media buttons to remember this page now!

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What Kind Of Fish Are In San Luis Reservoir?

  • Striped Bass
  • Largemouth Bass
  • White and Black Crappie
  • Bluegill and Sunfish
  • Perch
  • Catfish
  • Salmon (on rare occasions)*
  • Sturgeon (on rare occasions)*

San Luis Reservoir Fishing Tips & General Strategies

It can be a challenge to break down San Luis Reservoir and decide to get started. 

The primary game fish of this lake is striped bass. Most of the time you will find striped bass in deeper waters  between 50 to 90 feet deep. 

Striped bass can be caught on this Lake using spoons, poppers, topwater walking baits in the morning when they are chasing shad near the surface of the water. As the day continues, the striped bass will dive to deeper water and will continue to feed.

Trolling live and artificial baits will give you your best chances of catching a deep striped bass. 

There are also several feeder creeks and a large bay located throughout the lake. These areas are notorious for growing thick with weeds and submerged vegetation. This gives Largemouth bass anglers a prime location to target those fish.

High winds and breezy conditions are very common when fishing San Luis Reservoir. 

In fact there are wind warning lights and alarms placed strategically around the reservoir to give Anglers the chance to seek cover before the fast oncoming wind creates unsafe boating and fishing conditions.

Most of the fish such as bass, bluegill, crappie, and catfish will spawn in the spring.  Bass will spawn in 1’-15’-feet of water notably on rocky structure, gravel flats, humps, and small creek inlets and cuts.  

When the summer heat sets in, the bass, bluegill, and crappie will move to deeper water to approximately 15’-30’-feet of water. 

Focus on drops offs, channels, points, submerged humps. Deeper area with chunk rock ranging from baseball to basketball size will attract predatory fish like bass, crappie and catfish because it provides a safe area the prey (crayfish, bream, and minnows) can hide.

If you can find the ideal spot at the ideal depth then it will most likely assist you in catching fish.

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But Where Are The Best Places To Fish At San Luis Reservoir?

And in no particular order here is that list of the best fishing spots at San Luis Reservoir.

DISCLAIMER:  The material provided is for general information purposes only. It’s important to understand that any information provided in this article can change at any time. Any maps or graphics featured are not to be used as navigational aids. Fishing Blueprint will not be responsible for any personal injury or property damage from any misuse of the maps or graphics provided.   It’s completely impossible to give you every single spot where you can potentially catch a fish.  But, what this list does do is to give you a helping hand and narrow down to the most productive fishing spots.

Dinosaur Point

This is a moderate sized open bay that is best described by having several smaller creek ditches that drain into multiple larger creek channels, all of whom are submerged. This bay has many different structures you can target and fish. 

The main creek channels that drain from the bay to the main lake create underwater main lake points. Scan these areas because they will often have rocky high spots, ridges, humps, and ledges associated with them.

Moving further into the bay, make sure to scan the ditch and channel interactions. This area also has rocky high spots, ridges, humps, and ledges, along with channel swings that can hold fish.

Lastly, there are submerged trees and brush in the back of the feeder creeks in times of highwater conditions. 

Effective baits for this area include: topwater lures, buzzbaits, frog lures, crankbaits, soft plastic swimbaits, spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, chatterbaits, swim jigs, hair jigs, and underspin jigs when the bass are aggressive. Flutter spoons work great in the deeper channel sections and above any vertical timber as well.  

If the bass are timid, then drop shot, tubes, Ned rig, Neko rig, Mojo rig, Carolina rig, and football jigs all work really well.

Located: northwest lake

Structural features: creek channels, chunk rock bank submerged trees and brush

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shore fishing

Honker Bay

Honker Bay is another open bay, although slightly more open and flay than Honker Bay. 

It’s a smaller open bay that is best described by having one primary creek channel with numerous smaller creek ditches and washes into it 

This bay should be fished especially in high water conditions and during the spring has many different structures you can target and fish. 

The main creek channels that drain from the bay to the main lake create underwater main lake points. Scan these areas because they will often have rocky high spots, ridges, humps, and ledges associated with them.

Moving further into the bay, make sure to scan the ditch and channel interactions. This area also has rocky high spots, ridges, humps, and ledges, along with channel swings that can hold fish.

Lastly, there are submerged trees and brush in the back of the feeder creeks in times of highwater conditions. 

Effective baits for this area include: topwater lures, buzzbaits, frog lures, crankbaits, soft plastic swimbaits, spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, chatterbaits, swim jigs, hair jigs, and underspin jigs when the bass are aggressive. Flutter spoons work great in the deeper channel sections and above any vertical timber as well.  

If the bass are timid, then drop shot, tubes, Ned rig, Neko rig, Mojo rig, Carolina rig, and football jigs all work really well.

Located: northwest lake

Structural features: creek channels, chunk rock bank submerged trees and brush

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shore fishing

Cottonwood Creek

This section features a long rocky bank along the dike. The bank is characteristically very steep and made from large chunk rock to boulder-size substrate.

Naturally, crawfish, bluegill, minnows, and shad seek shelter in this area.

Given this embankment’s large area, it’s best to focus your efforts on cuts, points, boulder piles, and on transition areas from larger rock to smaller rock size.

Effective baits for this area include: topwater lures, buzzbaits, crankbaits, spinnerbaits, umbrella rigs, chatterbaits, jerkbaits, underspin jigs, swim jigs, hair jigs, and soft plastic swimbaits perform well here in breezy conditions.

In contrast, slower moving baits such as drop shot, football jigs, tubes, wacky rig, Texas rig, Neko rigs, and Carolina rigs can be phenomenal when the conditions are calm or the bass are holding close to the rocks.

Flutter spoons work great in the deepest part of the bank or over any secondary structures directly related to the bank.  

Located: north end of the lake

Structural features: steep artificial rocky bank

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak

San Luis Dam

Fishing just along the dam and in front of Romero Overlook can be outstanding if you’re trolling for striped bass or trout.

If the water is low, graph the cove just to the north of the dam and you can find deep water humps that rarely get fished.

Look closer…

screenshot Navionics - not to be used for navigation

This section of the lake can get very windy. And even with the best trolling motor the wind can quickly blow you off your spot which will significantly decrease your chances of catching a fish..

That is why we strongly suggest buying a quality drift sock. For those who don’t know, a drift sock is like a parachute for the water. If it’s breezy to windy, you need to slow your drift otherwise your lure will not be in the strike zone long enough to catch a fish.

By the way, we found a really good quality drift sock made by Mythik Outdoors, and best of all they’re sold on Amazon.com. Go here to learn more about drift socks and read the reviews from actual customers.  

Some of the effective baits for this area include: Fish attractor (ie: flasher or a doger), trolling umbrella rigs, soft plastic swimbaits, spoons, inline spinners, rapala minnows, flat fish, and wedding ring spinners. 

Located: east lake

Structural features: steep rocky bank

Best species to target: Striped bass, trout, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shoreline

Goosehead Point

Goosehead Point allows anglers to focus on bass relating to its steep bank filled with chunk rock and boulder piles. Fishing the transition areas (from larger rock to smaller rock size) will often catch you more bass.

Naturally, crawfish, bluegill, minnows, and shad seek shelter in this area.

Given this embankment’s large area, it’s best to focus your efforts on cuts, points, boulder piles, and on transition areas from larger rock to smaller rock size.

Effective baits for this area include: topwater lures, buzzbaits, crankbaits, spinnerbaits, umbrella rigs, chatterbaits, jerkbaits, underspin jigs, swim jigs, hair jigs, and soft plastic swimbaits perform well here in breezy conditions.

In contrast, slower moving baits such as drop shot, football jigs, tubes, wacky rig, Texas rig, Neko rigs, and Carolina rigs can be phenomenal when the conditions are calm or the bass are holding close to the rocks.

Flutter spoons work great in the deepest part of the bank or over any secondary structures directly related to the bank. 

Located: south east lake

Structural features: steep rocky bank and points

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shoreline fishing

Willow Springs Bay

This spot is great because it’s a “structure flat” when the water is low. 

The banks are fairly steep, down to 100-feet below normal pool level. After that it flattens out. 

There are several rocky secondary points that attract bass. Furthermore, there is a single large ditch for this entire bay that attracts fish year around.

On the west side of Willow Springs Bay is the large main lake point called Quien Sabe Point. This point is excellent for summer bass fishing due to the channel swing running into the northwest tip of the point.

Effective baits for this area include: topwater lures, buzzbaits, crankbaits, chatterbaits, soft plastic swimbaits, spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, swim jigs, hair jigs, and underspin jigs when the bass are aggressive. Flutter spoons work great when used over any deep structure or vertical timber as well.  

If the bass are timid, then drop shot, tubes, Ned rig, Neko rig, Mojo rig, Carolina rig, and football jigs all work really well.

Located: South end of the lake

Structural features: rocky points, rocky shelves, solitary drainage ditch

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shoreline fishing

Lone Oak Bay

This spot is defined by a deep water channel swings into close proximity of the bank making it a great spot for both boat fisherman and as well as shoreline anglers. 

The channel swings also create multiple ledges, ridges, drop offs and humps. 

The most productive areas will be where any channels or ditches are close to another type of structure (such as points, ledges, ridges, drop offs, or humps), or close to some form of cover (brush piles, laydowns, vertical standing timber, roadbeds, docks, bridge philippines or any other form of artificial structure).

Before trying to fish everything, be sure to take some time and scan these areas first with your fish finder to see if there are any bait or bass relating to that particular spot.  If you see bait or bass in the spot then fish it. 

Effective baits for this area include: crankbaits, soft plastic swimbaits, spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, chatterbaits, swim jigs, hair jigs, and underspin jigs when the bass are aggressive. Flutter spoons work great in the deeper channel sections as well.  

If the bass are timid, then drop shot, tubes, Ned rig, Neko rig, Mojo rig, Carolina rig, and jigs all work really well.

Located: southwest end of the lake

Structural features: channel swing into the bank, points, ledges, ridges, drop offs, and humps

Best species to target: Striped bass, largemouth bass, catfish, crappie

Most effective way to fish this spot: boat, kayak, shoreline fishing

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What Kind Of Fish Are In San Luis Reservoir?

Striped Bass

Commonly known as “stripers”, striped bass travel into freshwater streams to reproduce, yet they are saltwater natives.

Most landlocked striped bass will grow to an average size of 12-20 inches and weigh 1-3 pounds. However, some striped bass can grow to become enormous and can weigh as much as 70+ pounds! 

Because their eggs need to move in order to hatch, stripers prefer freshwater rivers and streams as spawning places.

Once a lake or river is dammed off, the area is often inundated by landlocked stripers.

One great example of this is the striped bass that are found in the Colorado river lakes near the California-Arizona border. The river was a key spawning habitat before dams were created, and many giant stripers have come from these waters.

When targeting stripers, focus the majority of your fishing on the deepest water the lake has to offer. Stripers are typically nearby if you can find schools of shad.

It’s strongly recommended you invest in a good fish finder/ sonar unit. Bait fish will appear as a clump of tiny dots suspended in the water column.  Additionally, striped bass will appear as larger arcs below or near the school of shad.  If you see striped bass near the school of shad you need to fish it.

Stripers may be caught on a variety of baits such as minnow baits, jointed crankbaits, umbrella rigs, or swimming spoons at proper depths when the baitfish are suspended over the deep water.

If you notice any surface feeding action, using topwater baits such as walking baits, or surface prop baits such as whopper ploppers make fishing an absolute blast. 

Jigging spoons perform insanely well when the stripers are deep.

Striped bass can often be found in medium to deep water coves and secondary lake arms. One of the first places to find striped bass is to look at your fishing map and find distinct changes in depth such as drop offs or river channel swings.

Striped bass can always be caught using live bait, cut bait (such as frozen anchovy, shad, shrimp, or squid – yep even in lakes), as well as chicken livers.

Lastly, trolling is another great approach to catch stripers. Use larger sizes of flashing lures. Stripers may be caught on a variety of baits such as minnow baits, jointed crankbaits, umbrella rigs, or swimming spoons

General Striped Bass Details

Spawn: April – mid-June in flowing water, current or rivers

Food: Shad, dead or alive. 

California State Record: 67 lb 8 oz. 45.25 in. O’Neill Forebay. Hank Ferguson, Soquel 5/7/1992

Table Quality: The meat is excellent. It’s firm, flaky and white. There is a red lateral line that must be removed otherwise it gives off a strong “fishy” taste. Otherwise, these make excellent fish fry meals.

Angling techniques:

  • Frozen shad or anchovies as “cut bait”
  • Small soft plastic swimbait
  • Spoons
  • Streamer flies

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth bass is a carnivorous member of the sunfish family.

California grows some MONSTER bass.  At any time you could hook into a bass that could be your all-time personal best.  

In general, if the water clarity is clear to a slightly stained lake. Meaning finesse techniques (like drop shot fishing), small lures (like football jigs), and thin diameter line gets you the most bites when the wind is calm. 

On the other hand, if the water is moderately stained or murky, then you need to choose darker lures. This also means you can get away with using thicker diameter line.

Since the 1980’s this lake has been stocked with Florida-strain largemouth bass. Bass fishing in this lake is not as popular as trout or salmon fishing. Luckily, you can still catch a giant bass by lobbying large swimbaits for glide baits in trout patterns. 

Once your arm gets tired you can still catch a ton of fish by throwing a drop shot rig, small crankbait, or dragging a Texas rigged Senko around a fish attracting structure.

If that doesn’t catchem, you can switch to either a drop shot rig or a Neko rig and target points, boulders, or channel swings. 

Read more: Beginner’s Guide To Bass Fishing Basics – Tips, Secrets & Things To Avoid

General Largemouth Bass Details

Spawn: Spring, March-May

Food: Shad, minnows, small trout, small salmon, bluegill, perch, crayfish

California State Record: 21lbs 12 oz. Caught in 1991 in Castaic Lake at the main boat ramp.

Table Quality: Decent. Firm white meat. 

Angling techniques:

White and Black Crappie

If you like crappie fishing, this lake is filled with them. 

The best time to fish for crappie in this lake and other lakes similar to it is in summertime while you’re night using a submerged green light. If you don’t know what a green fishing light is, or if you’re unfamiliar, then click this link to learn more.

Green light fishing at night in this lake is amazing. If you haven’t done it you are missing out. The nights are cool and the night sky is filled with stars…

Anyway, I digress…

White crappie tend to linger over submerged brush and timber and are found in schools. The white crappie are much more tolerant in warmer water than their black crappie cousins. 

White crappie have a more “silvery” appearance and lack the dark vertical bars when compared to the black crappie.  

Black crappie can be described as having irregular black dots and blotches on the back and have more of a “silvery-olive” background.

Average weight of a white or black crappie in this lake is probably going to be just under a pound. 

General Crappie Details

Spawn: April – mid-June

Food: Larvae, small fish, and crustaceans. Threadfin shad and minnows make up their main diet. 

California State Record: 

  • White crappie: 4 lbs 8 oz. Caught 4/26/1971 in Clear Lake using minnows.
  • Black crappie: 4 lbs 8 oz. Caught 2/17/2021 in Clear Lake using minnows.

Table Quality: The meat is excellent. It’s firm, flaky and white. 

Angling techniques:

  • Live minnows under bobbers
  • Crappie jigs
  • Crappie tubes
  • Silver spoons
  • Spinners

Catfish

There are four species of catfish in California, the blue catfish, bullhead catfish, channel catfish, white catfish.   

Catfish are predatory animals and scavengers. Some can get very big, while others remain small. They tend to spend most of their time on the bottom of the lake versus swimming higher in the water column suspended. 

Catfish can have up to 8 whisker-like barbels by their mouths to help them detect food. 

Blue catfish can get very big. They can weigh more than 100 pounds and grow to around 5 feet long. They have 8 whisker-like barbels by their mouths. They prefer larger cut bait and live bait 

Conversely, bullhead catfish tend to be smaller and will weigh on average about 1-2-pounds, but can grow to around 4-5-pounds. 

Channel catfish weight will range from 0.5-to-15-pounds in this lake, however the average weight will be between 1-4-pounds. 

The smallest of all catfish in North America is the white catfish. These catfish are considered rare by anglers’ standards. They average 1-2 pounds and will grow to only about a foot.

All species prefer warmer coves, but can also be found scavenging near the marinas, or around the dam.  

All can be caught with live bait, cut bait or dough bait. Some of the best baits you can use are chicken livers, hotdogs, anchovies, mackerel or sardines, catfish stink-bait/dough baits, or even night crawlers. warm coves or near the dam. 

General Catfish Details

Spawn: March-June

Food: Carp, bluegill

California State Record: 

Blue catfish –  72 lbs 14 oz. Caught 4/22/2003 in Colorado River (Riverside).

Bullhead catfish – 4 lbs 8 oz. Caught 10/7/1993 in Trinity Lake.

Channel catfish –  53 lbs 8 oz. Caught 9/22/2008 in San Joaquin River.

White catfish –  22 lbs 0 oz. Caught 3/21/1994 in Land Park pond (Sacramento).

Table Quality: Soft white meat. In the summer the meat will taste muddy.

Angling techniques:

  • chicken liver
  • hotdogs
  • stink bait
  • small live bluegill, sunfish, or perch
  • Frozen cut bait; anchovies, mackerel or sardines.

Bluegill or Sunfish

Also known collectively as “panfish” or “bream”, these small fish are both predators and prey. They fulfill a mid-tier predator role in the ecosystem. 

Panfish are highly aggressive and eat minnows, bass fry (newly hatched baby bass), and insects. 

The bluegill has teal-blue coloring on the bottom portion of the chin and gill plate. It also has a solid black opercula flap just behind the gill plate.

Fun fact: The oldest reported age for a bluegill is 10 years.

With the exception of appearance and size, the redear sunfish is quite similar to the bluegill. The dorsal fin of the redear sunfish features tiny vertical bands that go downward. It has a black dorsal color and a yellow-green ventral tint. The male’s operculum has a cherry-red edge, while the female’s has an orange coloring.

These panfish are found on the shoreline and prefer nearby structures. They are incredibly aggressive and will quickly attack anything that looks like it could be eaten. Due to their aggressive behavior, they are one of the easiest fish to catch and are a great way to introduce someone to fishing.

General Bluegill/ Sunfish Details

Spawn: April and May

Food: Small fish and insects

California State Record

Bluegill – 3 lbs 14 oz. Caught 6/22/2008 in Rancho Murieta Reservoir.

Sunfish (red ear) – 5 lbs 3 oz. 6/27/1994 in Folsom South Canal (Sacramento) 

Table Quality: Firm, white meat 

Angling techniques: 

  • Worms
  • Dough balls
  • Slim Jim sausages pieces on a small hook (not lying… it really works)
  • Small spinners
  • Trout flies

Chinook “King” Salmon (occasionally)

These landlocked salmon (commonly called King Salmon because they are the largest species of salmon found in the Pacific), with some fish weighing in at 10 to 12 pounds!  However, most of the fish will weigh in around 2-4-pounds.

These fish may be found in deep water (40-80-feet) throughout the year, but they are particularly abundant in the main channel near the dam in March. Try trolling with live anchovies or shad, as well as shad-like lures and spoons.

In the summer and fall, trolling shad is the easiest method to capture huge salmon and trout.

Salmon and trout chase shad to the surface, which is one of the most well guarded secrets.

If you notice them eating bait balls, you have to start trolling shad or something that can come close to matching the hatch.

Sure, worms and egg sacks will catch them, but why not make it simpler on yourself and troll what they eat the most?

Shad is a natural food source for these landlocked monsters.

In a typical California reservoir, shad may be found in the vast majority of them, otherwise minnows and other small baitfish will work just fine 

General King Salmon Details

Spawn: September – December

Food: Insects, small crustaceans, shad or other small fish. 

California State Record: 65 lbs 4 oz. Caught 8/21/2002 in Crescent City.

Table Quality: Depending on the fishes diet, the meat can be white to orange-red in color. The meat is firm, flaky, and is considered excellent eating.

Angling techniques:

  • Trolling shad
  • Spinners
  • Spoons
  • Streamer Flies
  • Worms
  • Salmon eggs
  • Powerbait

Boat Ramps at San Luis Reservoir

Dinosaur Point State Park Entrance Station

Location: northwest area of the lake

Dinosaur Point Rd, Hollister, CA 95023

(209) 826-1196

Lanes: 2

Restrooms: Yes

Showers: no

Gas: No

Camping nearby: Yes

San Luis Reservoir SRA

Location: south end of the lake

Address: 31426 Gonzaga Rd, Gustine, CA 95322

Phone: (209) 826-1196

(209) 826-1197

Lanes: 2

Restrooms: Yes

Showers: no

Gas: No

Camping nearby: Yes

Places to Tent Camp Or RV Camping At San Luis Reservoir

Traditional camping areas

Basalt Campground

Basalt Rd, Gustine, CA 95322

(209) 826-9709

Reservations and campground map

  • Sites – 79total. 
    • RV – some have hook ups, some don’t
    • Standard sites/ tent sites available
  • Dump station available: Yes
  • Low season: October – March
  • High season: April – September 
  • Pets welcome: Yes
  • Boat ramp nearby: Yes
  • Fire ring: Yes
  • Grill:  Yes
  • Drinking water:  Yes
  • Coin operated showers: Yes
  • Flush toilets:  Yes
  • Coin operated showers: Yes

San Luis Creek Campground

Gustine, CA 95322

(209) 826-9709

Reservations and campground map

  • Sites – 53 total. 
    • RV – some have hook ups, some don’t
    • Standard sites/ tent sites available
  • Dump station available: Yes
  • Low season: October – March
  • High season: April – September 
  • Pets welcome: Yes
  • Boat ramp nearby: Yes
  • Fire ring: Yes
  • Grill:  Yes
  • Drinking water:  Yes
  • Coin operated showers: no
  • Flush toilets:  no

Medeiros Campground

Donohugh Rd W, Gustine, CA 95322

(209) 826-9709

Reservations and campground map

  • Sites – primitive, first come – first served 
    • Standard sites/ tent sites only
  • Dump station available: no
  • Low season: October – March
  • High season: April – September 
  • Pets welcome: Yes
  • Boat ramp nearby: Yes
  • Fire ring: Yes
  • Grill:  Yes
  • Drinking water:  Yes
  • Coin operated showers: no
  • Flush toilets:  no

Los Banos Creek Campground

Los Banos, CA 93635

(209) 826-9709

Reservations and campground map

  • Sites – 20 total. 
    • RV – small sites, very limited in availability. 
    • Standard sites/ tent sites available
    • First come – first served 
  • Dump station available: no
  • Low season: October – March
  • High season: April – September 
  • Pets welcome: Yes
  • Boat ramp nearby: Yes
  • Fire ring: Yes
  • Grill:  Yes
  • Drinking water:  Yes
  • Coin operated showers: no
  • Flush toilets:  no

Tackle Shops Near San Luis Reservoir

Main Street Market Live Bait and Tackle

13301 CA-33, Gustine, CA 95322

Located in: Santa Nella RV Park

Walmart Supercenter

1575 W Pacheco Blvd, Los Banos, CA 93635

(209) 826-9655

Other Activities You Can Do At San Luis Reservoir

Fishing is not the only thing that brings people to the beautiful body of water. Here’s a list of other things you can do!

  • Biking
  • Bird watching
  • Boating
  • Skiing
  • Kayaking
  • Canoeing
  • Sailing
  • Swimming
  • Camping
  • Horseshoes
  • Picnicking
  • Hiking
  • Gentle walking trails
  • Nature photography trails
  • Wildlife viewing
  • Mountain biking
  • Stargazing
  • and most importantly… relaxing.

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